Sunday, August 28, 2016

Sunday Pics!


Spectacular quilt, wonderful little doll buggy, and she's holding a potted plant!  I love this!

A Blessed Sunday to You!

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Saturday at the Quilt Museum - Odd Fellows Quilts


The Odd Fellows pattern isn't one on which I have focused previously.  This first in the lineup is what caught my eye and got me interested in it.

Odd Fellows
Mid-1800's
10" block
86" x 90"



When you get up close to this, you can see that it's just an amazing array of scraps.  From a distance it has a much different feel.

There are more pictures here:
http://lesleyscollectibles.com/InfoPages/Q082.html

* * * * * * *

Odd Fellows with 9-Patch and Rails Sashing
1870's
Heavily Quilted


There's no provenance available on this one.  The eBay description said that it is heavily quilted, however.

As with so many quilt block patterns, there is such a different look achieved by adding sashing.

* * * * * * *
Odd Fellows
Made by the Fisher Sisters
Bergen County, New Jersey
1915



Using a single solid color for the squares and large triangle pieces in the blocks gives the lattice feel to it.

* * * * * * *

Odd Fellows
1900
84" x 84"

This one has a totally different feel to it with alternating blocks and being set on point.

I found it here:
http://www.pookandpook.com/cat/2013-03-20/34

* * * * * * *

Odd Fellows
Wisconsin
1875-1900


No provenance on this one.  Again, such a different feel to it when the blocks are made in different colors.

* * * * * * *

Here's a block pattern with cutting directions.

Have fun!




For a 10" Block:

A - Cut 4 - 2 1/2" squares

B - Cut 1 - 7 1/4"" square and cut diagonally 2 times for 4 triangles

C - Cut 4 - 2 7/8" squares and cut diagonally 1 time for 8 triangles

D - Cut 6 - 3 1/4"" squares and cut diagonally 2 times for 24 triangles

E - Cut 1 - 3 3/8"" square

For a 5" Block: (For a mini!)

A - Cut 4 - 1 1/2" squares

B - Cut 1 - 4 1/4"" square and cut diagonally 2 times for 4 triangles

C - Cut 4 - 1 7/8" squares and cut diagonally 1 time for 8 triangles

D - Cut 6 - 2 1/4"" squares and cut diagonally 2 times for 24 triangles

E - Cut 1 - 1 7/8"" square


I HAVEN'T MADE THIS BLOCK USING THE ABOVE CUTTING INSTRUCTIONS!
I HOPE THEY ARE CORRECT.  I'VE DOUBLE-CHECKED, BUT UNTIL I MAKE IT, I NEVER KNOW!


Happy Quilting!


PLEASE NOTE:
- I am not a quilt historian.  I simply enjoy finding interesting quilts and sharing them with you!

- The quilt images on this post were sourced from Pinterest, unless otherwise noted, and are linked to their origin whenever possible.






Wednesday, August 24, 2016

2016 Block of the Week! - Week 22

Border 8 – Hexagon Florets
Assemble

This border has mitered corners. If you've never done them, they can be intimidating. I'll share a way I recently learned from my daughter that has taken the “fright” out of it for me.

NOTE:
  • I recommend taking a practice run before you do the real thing.
  • It will help you determine your sewing machine's seam allowance tolerances and make accuracy more attainable.
  • I made a sample from a 9” square and 4” border strips.

Step-by-Step
  • For marking, I use a Frixion pen.
A. Quilt Top:

  • 1. Measure the existing quilt top – it should be 54” square, or very close to that.

B. Border:

  • 1. Divide that measurement (54”) in half (27”).
  • 2. Take a border piece and find the center and mark it.

  • 3. Measure that half distance (27”) to either side of center and make marks.

  • 4. From each mark, draw a 45º angle to the outside edge of the border as shown.

  • NOTE: Your border will most likely be longer than shown and the 45° lines will not be ending at the corners, but there will be fabric beyond the end of the lines.

  • 5. Cut on the lines as shown.

  • 6. Now, on each angle you have cut, on the wrong side of the border, mark seam lines as shown:
  • A scant 3/8 on the angle cut.
  • ¼” on the straight edge.
  • 7. Note where the lines cross and make a dot.


Quilt Top:

  • 1. On the wrong side of the fabric, at each corner, mark ¼” seam allowances as shown.
  • 2. Make a dot where seam lines intersect.


Putting them together:

  • 1. Now, pin the border to the quilt edge, right sides together.
  • 2. Match the centers.
  • 3. Match the dots on the border (where the seam lines cross) to the dots on the quilt corner.


  • 4. Sew a ¼” seam from dot to dot.
  • 5. Repeat this with all four of the border corners.


  • 6. Now, at each corner of the quilt, fold the quilt top back out of the way at the dots.

  • 7. Right sides together, matching dots and outside edges, pin along the 3/8” line, pulling the body of the quilt out of the way.

  • 8. Sew on the 3/8” line from point A at the outside edge to the corner dot. Backstitch.

  • 9. Do the same on the 3 remaining corners.
  • 10. Press the miter seams open and the ¼” seams toward the border.

Don't ask me how this works, but it does!!




Appliqué

  • Appliqué last 4 hexie florets on the corners as shown below.


  • The quilt should now measure about 66” square.

Next week we'll add the last border!!

This project was first seen on the Piecing the Past Quilts Blog




Sunday, August 21, 2016

Sunday Pics!

Because I love clothing of antiquity and have made a number of reproduction mid-19th century dresses, as well as men's and children's clothing, the accoutrements of the period are of great interest to me, also.

This woman is wearing a lovely Chatelaine.  They are kind of like having our sewing kits hanging on our belts!


I'm including a closeup picture of another one
so you can get an idea of what they're like.
Amazing, aren't they?





This one had the following description:
Heart shaped plaque with reticulated repousse allegorical figures
and five appendages of various origins and makers consisting of
scissors and scabbard, thimble bucket,
thread wax, mirror and heart shaped box.



A Blessed Sunday to You!


Saturday, August 20, 2016

Displaying Little Quilts



Back a ways I posted ways to Display Little Quilts.  I thought it would be fun to revisit that idea!

In that first post, we looked at baskets, boxes, clotheslines, doll beds, frames, hangers, and other ideas.  I have found some other fun possibilities.  Let's take a look at them!


An Old Clipboard




A Pickle Crock




A Custom Rack




A Doll Dispaly




A Mini Metal Washtub




A Wire Basket




A Mini Hanger




On a Trunk




On an Antique Dresser




On Old Rakes


Private Collection


 For more ideas, follow the links under the pictures!

Thanks for joining us!




Friday, August 19, 2016

Important 2016 Rose Medallion Block of the Week Project Information!

For those of you making the Rose Medallion quilt, just a reminder that the patterns will be up on the blog until September 14th and then will be taken down.  If you need any of the pattern segments, please get them downloaded before then.

We will be running the project again in a different format sometime in 2017.  The information will appear here on the blog when that time comes.

Thanks for joining us on the project!


Wednesday, August 17, 2016

2016 Block of the Week! - Week 21

Border 8 – Hexagon Florets

Appliqué hexie florets to the border strips.

  • 1. Start with 1 in the center of each border strip
  • 2. Space them on 6” centers, with 9 on each strip, as shown in the illustration.
  • 3. *The remaining 4 will go on the corners after you join the border corners.

PLEASE NOTE:
  • If you are nervous about the florets centering properly, you can always add the borders to the quilt first and then locate and appliqué the florets afterward.



Trim

  • Trim the borders to 6 ½” wide.
  • Measure 3 ¼” from the center to each edge and trim.



Next week we'll finish Border 8!

This project was first seen on the Piecing the Past Quilts Blog